Choose Vitamin D

Oh mister sun, sun, mister golden sun, please shine down on me! Your welcome now you have to finish the whole song in your head! I think that rhyme was ahead of the game when it came out. This song teaches kids that we need to get outside and embrace the sun! I highly doubt the motivation in making this song was to increase the importance of the sun to make vitamin D, but it works. As we approach the time of year when the sun is stuck behind the clouds more than we care for and the temperatures force us inside; we need to take advantage of the sunny days and get outside!

The main function of vitamin D is to help in control of your calcium levels throughout the body. Failure to have enough vitamin D can lead to decreased bone density and increased muscle fatigue. Vitamin D deficiency has also been associated with many acute and chronic illnesses including disorders of calcium metabolism, autoimmune diseases, some cancers, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and infectious diseases. Supplementation is obviously an avenue to increase the concentration inside your body but nothing works as well as the big giant yellow thing in the sky!

If you do not know your vitamin D levels I do recommend getting blood work done through a doctor to see what your levels may be. Due to the low amount of sunlight the majority of us get I suggest a supplementation of at least 2000 IU/day of Vitamin D3. The adequate dose for Vitamin D is 4000 IU/day. Higher dosages should be taken from September – May due to time spent indoors and lack of sun exposure. The amount of Vitamin D that I recommend should be in your system is 40-80 ng/mL. The vast majority of people have levels which are much less than this, which is why it is so important that this be addressed in your daily diet. Again before supplementing with anything you should always consult with you healthcare professional to be sure that it will not have any adverse effects!

Dr. Alan Broering D.C., CCSP® 

Eat Well. Move Well. Live Well.

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